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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
for eight years before assuming his current post in 2009. he is in new york for the u.n. general assembly, nato has significantly redefined its mission since its founding in 1949. it's primarily-- last year it enforce add no-fly zone in libya and the campaign that overthrew moammar qaddafi. i'm pleased to have the secretary general at this table, welcome. tell me how you have defined the role for nato in the current environment, especially in the middle east. >> the core role is still to protect our citizens against any threat to their security we won the cold war. we protected our citizens against soviet communism, aggression. we won the cold war. the soviet broke down but after the end of the cold war we realized that we are faced we merging security challenges, terrorism, this is the reason why we are in afghanistan. that's why we are now building a nato missile defense system to protect our populations against milz attacks. piracy, this is the reasons why we conduct counterpiracy operation. so across the board we have taken on responsibility for new missions but, again, with the core
become a challenge. >> the u.n. official said countries should make full use of labor force for long term economic growth. he called on japan to share its experiences with the world's fastest aging population. >>> an old tale of love found and lost moved a new audience last month in moscow. coin of vows tells the story of two people who meet and form a strong connection even though their countries are waging war. >> reporter: it takes place in western japan during the japanese war in 1904. nicolai has an eye injury. he has been transported to hospital in the city. at first he closes himself off to the japanese, but tender care from a japanese nurse has his resolve. eventually the two fall in love. the idea for the musical was hatched after a russian gold coin that is more than 100 years old was discovered. the coin was found on the grounds of a hospital where russian prisoners of war were treated. engraved on the coin are the names of a japanese woman and a russian man. research proved these people existed. the woman was a japanese nurse. the man a soldier from russia. the coin appears to
to the u.n., susan rice, to resign. this coming as rice faces mounting criticism for her initial remarks in the days after the assault on our u.s. consulate in libya, saying it was spontaneous. meanwhile hundreds of libyans turning over their weapons at this hour. the libyan army setting up a gun amnesty program. winners of a lottery will receive electronics or cars. >>> and congressman paul ryan in the swing state of ohio tonight. congressman ryan just now wrapping up the speech. he was the guest of honor at the u.s. national sports and alliance banquet in columbus. >>> concern right now among some republicans about the accuracy of some of the presidential polling coming from some of the mainstream media. one claim that some surveys oversample democrats, a trend that could give president obama an edge over governor mitt romney on election day if republican voters don't think they can close the gap. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel reports now from washington. >> go up and down, we have plenty of time. >> history shows late september leads can evaporate by election day. in
's for and -- foreign minister. >> addressing the u.n. general assembly, he claimed that france, the u.s., saudi arabia, qatar, and turkey were injured. in the syrian domestic fears -- were interfering in syrian domestic affairs. in syria itself, dozens of civilians have died in the army shelling and air raids at various flashpoints. that is according to the syrian observatory for human rights. they have been named -- peer steinbruck has been named as a candidate for chancellor in next year's election. >> this nomination is expected to receive widespread endorsement at a special party conference in december. >> the unanimous support of the party executive was no doubt a welcome surprise for peer steinbruck. while the election is still a long way away, he is already setting the tone for the campaign. >> it may involve a bit of humor and a bit of wit. some of the best weapons to use against your political opponents are wit and positive imagery with other than just a head-on attack. >> steinbruck says germany needs to put the focus back on a socially-just a market economy. -- socially-just market economy.
the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nation, and it's a way of denying any legitimacy to the claim
in syria will not spiral into a wider conflict. >> there has been jostling argument -- on the u.n. security council on how to respond to this situation. turkey's allies want a statement condemning the action by the syrians. >> western diplomats complained that russia's proposals would weaken the statement to an unacceptable degree. >> all sides have been voicing grave concern at the syrian civil war spilling over into the wider region. >> chancellor angela merkel expressed regret for the loss of life in turkey. she urged both sides to show discretion. >> we call on all parties to remain level headed. but it is clear that germany condemned the syrian attacks on germany -- on turkey. we stand beside turkey. >> stern countries were united in saying that the conflict cannot -- western countries were united in saying that the conflict cannot be allowed to spill over into neighboring countries. >> we do not want to see a continuing escalation of this incident. >> but syria's ally, russia, took a different tack. foreign minister certification a blackrock said the fault did not lie with -- foreign
to be done to deal with the consequences in the developing world. the u.n. population fund says that the number of people over age 60 will be over 1 billion. there is plenty more to come, do stay with us. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
they don't want what they see i a repeat of libya, u.s. ad west going behind the u.n. resolution. >> or being on the side line and the language of the u.n. resolution was expanded beyond what -- >> the second thing, they are also saying they don't want to substitute an al white dick aloe white dictator and that is a ridiculous point, it is not a ridiculous point because the truth of the sectarian divisions that exist within syria, there has to be found a way for those countries to, for those communits -- >> you agree with the russians -- >> look, the russians -- >> wha what don't you agree wit? >> their concern is not a stupid one, and that doesn't justify what they have done because they have stood in the way in a bellicose way, mainly because of this point they don't want the west to be seen to get a victory and in the end -- >> and they also want to be a player? >> they do, look they want to be dealt with like a superpower and the best way to do that is to be positive contributors to the international system and not blockers. >> but i mean, foreign minister lap i don't have ar
for the resignation of u.n. bambass dorsusan rice who, said that it appeared to be a spontaneous uprising against an anti-muslim video. >> five days went by. we have reports that intelligence people knew within 24 hours that this was a terror attack, yet, they sent her out to say things that were absolutely false and continue to do so, which is, again... really either as i say, willful, ignorance or abysmal lack of knowledge of the facts. >> reporter: but the administration claims it was so complex, they didn't know for sure it was a terror attack. and david axelrod saying, we don't want a president who shoots first and aims later. >> governor romney leaped out on this libya issue on the first day. and was terribly mistaken about what he said. that is not what you want in a president of the united states. and as for senator mccain, for whom i have great respect, he has disapproved of our approach in libya from the beginning. >> reporter: democrats say the focus needs to be on protecting american personnel in the future. >> thank you. another suspected incident of a deadly insider attack in afghan
namic. that is on the agenda at the u.n. what do we expect there? >> reporter: that's right. there will be a meeting today sort of on the sidelines of the general assembly. it will be hosted by secretary of state hillary clinton. it is a meeting of the friends of syria. it will be attended by ministers of some 20 countries. the purpose of this meeting essentially to show support for the syrian opposition and to address the humanitarian concerns. the risch shan foreign minister is going to speak today. likely he will talk about syria. the russian foreign minister said yesterday russia is not going to offer asylum to the syrian president, bashar assad if that is sought. he also said russia is not pressuring assad to step down. martha, one statistic that is very disturbing. since monday, since the start of the general assembly this week, 489 people have been killed in syria because of that ongoing conflict. today we'll hear russia address it but unlikely we'll see any resolution anytime soon. martha: tragic and press, pressing event and on going store. david lee, thank you very
warning world leaders that iran is very close to building nuclear weapons. in his speech to the u.n. general assembly on the threat posed by iran making headlines across the globe. leland vittert is live in jerusalem with reaction there. leland? >> reporter: gregg, the most interesting thing here is this is the first time the israeli prime minister has really laid out what would bring about an israelly strike. the first time there has been a true threat made. it is on the front page of every newspaper here. here it says the red line, spring 2013. when he did up at the u.n. draw that red line it was at the 90% mark, meaning right before iran began work on a nuclear bomb, when it completed the enrichment process. that was definitely a movement of the timeline. there had been a lot of talk about a possible strike sometime before the u.s. election. the speech at the united nations seems to have pushed that off a little bit. the prime minister made a very tough case against the iranians for supporting hamas and hezbollah, both organizations that used suicide bomb attacks around the world
be pessimistic about the future of the european union. you could say to the u.n. security counsel has back in to a or really a sis, you could look at the international trading environment and wonder about that. to me, and this is the answer to your question. i think john and i would agree, a world in which the united states is still strong but the institutions eroding is not a world i want to live in. and therefore the united states does have an interest in trying the best to shore up the institutions. >> sublg subtly agree. >> bob is coming i way. >> way to ruin it, john. >> here's a couple of quick point. number one, my thesis is not institutions are infeint. they infused with power. they are used to power. it they are used to signal limit on power. mower is divorced from institutions. and in that regard, i argue that the u.s. has been brilliant on the world stage for half a century or longer. it has tide the power to the institutions that both allowed it to make the power more occur able and expansive but also making it more delimited and less discriminated in the arbitrary use of power
.k. parliamentarian says we should. he is here with me now. this is weird. can the u.n. tale -- actually do this? >>guest: only if it is supported by the members. is a surprisingly open and aggressive bid if world government. it fits exactly with obama's strategy which he openly declares is "redistribution of wealth" from the successful to the less successful in the up. this goes a long step further. this is redistribution of american and european wealth to the third world. it is nasty enough to pay taxes to a huge government that interferes with your life but to pay and throw it around the old whorl it will mean abject policy. >>neil: but there is precedent when you fly into a european union member countries you pay a tax that goes to the e.c. and a variety of things that go to that community and the member countries whether they individually like it or not. at least on that level, there is precedent. why would the united nations push this to the point we are paying all the extra global taxes on top of what are excessive to begin with? >>guest: rightly so. the european union was set up by decei
say the u.n. security council has fallen back into a kind of paralysis. you could look at the international trade environment and wonder about that. this is the answer to your question, to me, and i think john and i would agree, a world in which the u.s. is still strong but all of these institutions are eroding is not a world i want to live in. the u.s. really does have an interest in trying its best to shore up these institutions. >> bob is coming my way. this is great. [laughter] just a couple quick points. my thesis is not that these institutions are independent. they are infused with power. they are instruments of power. they are used to signal limits on power. power is never divorced from institutions. in that regard, i argue the u.s. has been so brilliant on the world stage for half a century or longer because it has tied its power to these institutions that has both allowed it to make its power and more durable and expensive but also make it more limited and less based on the indiscriminate arbitrary use of power in the more literal sense. there is an argument ab
to the u.n. general assembly was cut short by the tragic assassination of the professor then chairman of the high peace council. his life was taken by a terrorist who posed as a emmerson recommitting and by doing so was a serious blow. however, fortunately, the late professor stepped up to take the share of the highest council is part of the afghan delegation and present in the assembly today. i have repeated often times an hour hand of peace and reconciliation extended not only to the taliban, but also all other armed opposition groups that wish to return to the dignified, peaceful and independent lives in their own homeland. what we ask of them in return is simple. violence cutting ties with terrorist networks reserving the valuable gains of the past decade and respecting the constitution of afghanistan to help facilitate the peace process, i ask the united nations security council to extend its full support to our efforts. in particular, i urge the taliban sanctions security to take more active measures towards the listing of the taliban leaders to facilitate the direct negotiation
of the european union and you can see the u.n. security council has fallen back into a kind of paralysis. you could look at the international trading environment and wonder about that. to me, and this is the answer to the question, and john would agree, the world in which the denied states is still strong but all the institutions are eroding is not a world i want to live in and therefore the united states does have an interest in trying its best to show up these institutions. >> bob is coming my way. this is great. >> a couple quick points. number one, my thesis is not that these institutions are independent. they are in fused with power and instruments of power and they are used to signal limits on power, power is never divorced from institutions. and in that regard, i argue that the u.s. has been so great on the world stage because it's tied the power to the institutions that spoke to make power more durable and expensive, but also making it more limited and less based on the indiscriminate arbitrary use of power in the traditional sense. so there is an argument about how the institutions c
, they trotted out the u.n. ambassador who said this is a spontaneous demonstration bread by a hateful video. now, that is one of the most disgraceful performances i have ever seen. first year cadet at west point would have told you that that was -- you know, there is -- people sitting around benghazi, grab your mortar, honey, we're going to a spontaneous demonstration. >> gretchen: but senator, looking ahead then to these next debates, i don't know if the president will have it any better off because foreign policy, when we start talking about this, when mitt romney starts talking about it or the moderator, there is going to be a lot of questions to answer and it may be the first time that the president is forced to answer questions about libya. >> well, he did answer questions about his foreign policy. remember, he just said there was a few bumps in the road. iraq is unraveling. al-qaeda is coming back. afghanistan is in total disarray because of this killing of americans by afghan military people and it's because the president keeps announcing we're leaving and it's overruled his military advi
. >> thank you, senator. that brings us to the conclusion of tonight's n.e.t. news nebraska u.s. senate debate. thanks to senator fisher and senator kerrey for participating. thanks to our panel of journalists and our audience and all of you who you watching or listening at home. this debate will be archived and available on the website and on our facebook page. leave a comment on how you felt the candidates did this evening. make a note to watch our one- hour voter voices election special. that will be coming up from n.e.t. news on october 19th at 7:00 p.m. central time. thank you once again from all of us at n.e.t. news for watching us. don't forget to vote on november 6 and goodnight. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the urban institute hosted for, what may happen to individual taxes if congress does not address the sokol fiscalcliff live on c-span 2 and noon eastern. on c-span 3, education secretary arne duncan speaks of the national press club on the state education law that at 1:00 p.m. easter. n. s
, in the postwar n-cold war environment, what should be the overriding u.s. national interest? and what can the united states do, and what can it afford to do, to defend the national interest? >> again, if you're not rich, you're not a superpower. so we have two that i'd put as number one. i have number 1 and 1a. one is we've got to have the money to be able to pay for defense, and we've got to manufacture here. believe it or not folks, you can't ship it all overseas, you've got to make it here. and you can't convert from potato chips to airplanes in an emergency. see, willow run could be converted from cars to airplanes in world war ii because it was here. we've got to make things here. you can't ship them overseas anymore. i hope we can talk more about that. second thing, on priorities. we've got to help russia succeed in its revolution and all of its republics. when we think of russia, remember we're thinking of many countries, now. we've got to help them. that's pennies on the dollar compared to renewing the cold war. third, we've got all kinds of agreements on paper, and some that are
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)